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Different cargo bike brakes

Cargo bikes, just like ordinary bicycles, can come with different types of brakes. All Babboe cargo bikes have two or three independently functioning brakes. The cargo bikes with electric pedal assistance (E-Variants and Mountain) are equipped with disc brakes. Babboe cargo bikes without pedal assistance are equipped with rollerbrakes (optional disc brakes at the front are available). Several non-electric models have drum brakes. Which type of brakes is best for you and your bicycle? With the help of the overview below, you can choose which brakes are perfect for you.

The three types of cargo bike brakes:

Drum brakes
Drum brakes are similar to rollerbrakes. The brake pads on the inside are pushed against the metal drum. The brake pads for drum brakes differ from other types of brakes. The following cargo bike models are equipped with drum brakes: Big (front and rear), Big-E (front), Dog (front and rear), Dog-E (front), Transporter (front and rear) and Transporter-E (front).

Rollerbrakes
Rollerbrakes can be found in the middle of the wheel and looks like a ring with rollers. The cam pushes these rollers against the outside of the drum. This causes friction and makes the bicycle slow down. When hitting the brakes with maximum force, the brake force will be dampened. This prevents the wheels from locking up and prevents you from slipping. The following cargo bikes are equipped with rollerbrakes Curve, City, Mini, Big (rear), Dog (rear) and Transporter (rear).

Disc brakes
A calliper pushes against a disc located around the bicycle hub on both sides. The pressure power of disc brakes is very high. Mechanical disc brakes make use of brake cables. The longer the cable, the more friction the system can cause. Hydraulic disc brakes make use of brake fluid. Because of the lesser friction loss, the brake force can be dosed more easily. All Mountain models are equipped with hydraulic disc brakes. And all electric models have mechanical disc brakes. These are the: Curve-E, City-E, Mini-E, Carve-E, Big-E (rear), Dog-E (rear), Transporter-E (rear) and Max-E (rear).
Hydraulic disc brakes are very reliable. You will need a special tool for maintenance. Mechanical disc brake cables are more prone to corrosion and dirt, but are easier to maintain or repair.

The steering of three-wheel cargo bikes can be hampered considerably, regardless of the brake type, when the right and left front wheel brakes do not function simultaneously. This could happen when the brake cables are not of the same length. An exception are hydraulic disc brakes, as both front wheel brakes make use of pressure compensation.

Advantages and disadvantages of each brake type:

Drum brakes
Drum brakes
+ Minor abrasion
+ Unaffected by weather conditions
- High-maintenance
- Heavy and not very powerful
- Difficult to dose
rollerbrakes
Rollerbrakes
+ Weatherproof and reliable
+ Minor abrasion
+ Low-maintenance
+ Perfect in cities and flat landscapes
- Brakes heavy and not so powerful
- Difficult to dose
- The brakes can lose brake force while consecutive braking 
Disc brakes
Disc brakes
+ Powerful and easy to dose
+ Little manual force required
+ Functions very well in the rain
+ Perfect for the country and hilly areas
+ Low-maintenance
- Prone to dirt
- Prone to corrosion